Be Ready Utah PrepCast Episode 10: Safety and Security, Part 2 (Home Security)

Be Ready Utah PrepCast Episode 10: Safety and Security, Part 2 (Home Security)


[jazzy music] Wade: Welcome to the Be Ready Utah PrepCast.
I’m Wade Mathews, the Be Ready Utah manager for the Division of Emergency
Management. Joining me today are Bryan Stinson and Jeff Johnson, emergency
preparedness outreach specialists. And we are coming to you with part two of our
safety and security discussion today. So again let’s just jump right in. Last
time we talked about safety— Jeff: In the home. Wade: Around the house, in the home.
Now security. You know there’s risks, unfortunately. There’s
dangers out there. What do we want to do to not be the victim? We want to prevent
ourselves from being the victim. Jeff: We live in a society where people will
victimize us. There are criminals and there are evil people. And so I think the
very most important thing is for you to be situationally aware. What does it mean
to be situationally aware? It means that you don’t walk into a problem, you don’t
drive into a problem. You actually are scanning ahead, you’re looking around,
you’re you’re being situationally aware. We all see the funny YouTube videos of
people holding up their cell phones and walking right into something and getting
hurt, or walking into a fountain, or something. You can’t do that. You need to
be aware of your surroundings. All we’re asking you to do, all that’s
really required for this is, like when you’re walking to some place, scan ahead.
Look around. Wade: Assess. Jeff: Yeah. Wade: Assess. Are there any dangers around here right now? Are
there any risks right now? And while you’re doing that, you also determine, if
something happened, where are my exits? How do I get out of here? That’s
part of situational awareness as well. Jeff: You’re leaving the grocery store late at night
and instead of walking right up to your car without checking, scan it from a
distance. Look around. Look around the parking lot. See if there’s
anything that might make you want to go back inside and reassess what you’re
doing. Is somebody parked next to your car that doesn’t look like it’s somebody
you want to approach? Go back in the store. Contact the store personnel and
say, “Can I get an escort to my car?” Wade: Yeah. Bryan: I was going to say one thing. My wife and I, when we go out on a date or something, she thinks I may be a
little nutty. Maybe I am. Okay. No comments. Thank you.
But one thing I like to do is, when we go find a booth they say, “Is this a good
place?” and I say, “Can we have one near an exit?” You know I specifically request that. Or you know like we’re at a hotel or something,
I point out to her, “That’s where the exits are.” You see the exit and you know
you actually walk to the to the emergency exit so you know exactly where
it is. Wade: Exactly. All right now, into the home itself. Our own homes, where we spend
the most of our time. How do we make sure we’re gonna be safe at home? The
“nightly five”. There’s a five step thing that we can all
implement and start doing this on a regular basis, every night to make sure
that we’re gonna be a little bit safer and not be the victim. Jeff: And it boils down to really two categories, locks and lights. But you want to do a nightly five every
night. That’s the first thing. Make sure all the doors in your house are locked
before you retire for the night. Another thing you want to do is to walk around
and check your windows. You may not want to have all those windows closed. Some
people leave windows open at night, but if you gonna leave that window open two
or three inches and let a breeze in, then cut a wooden dowel and drop it into the
slot, the sliding slot, for the window so that somebody from the outside can’t
grab that window and slide it the rest of the way open. Wade: Number three is close
and lock the garage door. How often do we leave that garage door open in the
middle of the day, but you know sometimes at night too. We don’t want to do that.
That’s just a invitation to come on in there’s a lot of times that backdoor
into the garage is not locked into the house. Jeff: Nighttime burglaries
often start at the cars or the garages. So you also want to lock your cars. I
don’t care the cars in the garage, lock the car. And then lock your cars outside.
But people who are going to burglarize, don’t really at nighttime try to enter
the home, but they will try to enter your garage and they definitely will try to
enter your vehicles. So, going through these things: 1) Lock your doors 2) Check your
windows 3) Secure your garage, and the fourth one is 4) Lock your cars, and then
the fifth one is really, really a no-brainer, 5)Turn on some lights outside,
at least your porch light. And you know, as a patrol officer, I used to drive by
houses and it’d be completely dark ones right next to one that had a front light on,
a side light on, the rear light on. That’s a no-brainer. But nobody’s gonna approach
those lighted homes as quickly as they will approach a dark home. Wade: And Bryan, there’s some things we can do around the house to, to kind of reduce the
opportunity for the bad guy around the house, right? Such as trimming bushes and
those types of things. Bryan: Sure. Yeah. You don’t want to have any any dark places or with the lights you don’t want any places that they can be hiding.
Trim your bushes back, especially the ones that are around entrances. Jeff: And
windows. Bryan: And windows. Yeah. One thing I was thinking about, I’ve heard a lot of
times people break into cars to get the little garage door openers, because once
they get that garage door open, they get the garage door open, and
then they’ve got a path right into the house. Some other things I’ve heard, is the
bad guys a lot of times they have the mindset that, “Well if they’re not making
any, if the homeowner’s not making any efforts to keep me out of their house,
I’m entitled to all of the stuff in their house. Yeah. I think it’s mine
because they’re not making any efforts to to secure their things.” So we’ve got
to make sure that we make things as difficult as possible for those that may
be trying to get into our homes and to harm us or our families or our stuff
because if we’re a difficult target, they’ll move on someplace else that’s a
lot easier. Jeff: This falls under four categories. Its “deter”, “delay”, “deny”, and
“detect”. DETERrence is what you’re talking about. If somebody drives up and looks at
three houses on the block, yours ought to be the hardest one, the one that looks
like it’s the toughest to get into. The bushes are trimmed, the lights are on,
you have good locks on your doors— Wade: Garage door’s down. Jeff: Garage door’s down. Yeah, you want the burglar to look at him and say, “I’m going somewhere else.
The University of Florida did a 1994 study of 10,000 burglars. The number
one thing that keeps people away from houses? Dogs. A dog will alert people, and
alert the neighbors, and everything else. So there are some real simple things
like, just making sure your dog is of the sort that will deter people. You
want to DELAY people from getting in. If they do try to get into your house, make
it hard. Make it really hard. You know, lock all your windows. Put dowels in the
windows slots. Have dead bolts. And then the next thing you want to do is DENY them. If they get into your house, don’t have valuables out scattered
everywhere. Take your valuables and put them out of sight, hard to find. Once
they’re inside if they do get inside, you want to make sure that they can’t find
things very easily that they want to steal. And then the last one is is
DETECT them and that’s cameras, video doorbells,
alarms, any kind of motion detector lights, help with that on the outside. You
want to detect them if they’re there. And motion detector lights are a great
deterrent. If somebody’s walking down your driveway, heading for your
garage, and all of a sudden two motion detector lights come on, they’re not staying. So
these are great ways to detect people and also deter them.
So remember: deter, delay, deny, detect. Bryan: Along with that, say like you’re going on vacation, it’s a good idea to
make it look like somebody’s still there. Maybe have a car in the driveway,
not necessarily just in the garage, so it looks like somebody’s there.
Put on some of those delay timer lights, so your lights come on. Make sure you’ve got a trusted neighbor that
can come and collect your mail— Jeff: Or have it stopped. Bryan: Or have it stopped. Maybe even better. And you know, if you’re gone long enough, have somebody
mow your lawn so it doesn’t like you’re overgrown. Jeff: Great tips. Wade: Excellent. A
lot of this information we’re talking about is available on this this brochure,
this little printout with protecting your home from burglars. And
it’s got a great home security checklist right here, as well. And we got this from
the Salt Lake City Police Department website, correct? You know what the URL is
by chance? Or we’ll just put that up on the screen. Jeff: It’s slcpd.com. Wade: Okay all right. So
you can go get this checklist right from the Salt Lake City PD website. We
recommend it, a lot of good safety tips here. And then lastly, I’m just gonna
throw this out here really quickly. Have a little bit of self-defense in mind. If
all these other things don’t work, whatever that is, have some self-defense
in mind inside the house. Jeff: These four “D”s that we talked about have gone to a fifth “D”. The fifth “D” that’s added on a lot of these is “defend”. Wade: Yeah. Jeff: Defend yourself.
Wade: Choose some way of defending yourself. We’re not gonna get
into the politics of that, but be prepared to defend yourself.
Bryan: Flashlights and phones are two good things to have as well. If you are at
home, flashlights for nights, and a phone that you can call 9-1-1. Wade: Okay.
Jeff: Realize again, 9-1-1, there gonna be three to seven minutes getting there.
Bryan: True. Wade: Again, back to that fifth “D” then, defend yourself. Jeff: You might have to be on your own for five
minutes. And if somebody’s in your home that’s a long time.
Wade: Yes. Thank you very much guys. Again, thank you for joining us here on the Be Ready
Utah PrepCast. All of our PrepCasts are available on the Be Ready Utah
YouTube channel, on our Facebook page, and on our Twitter. And what’s our hashtag, Bryan?
Bryan: #BRUPrepCast. Wade: Alright. Thank you very much. Please put
some comments on there, some questions. We’ll try to answer those for you
on a future episode of the Be Ready Utah PrepCast. See you next time. [jazzy music] [rock music] Hey! Hhope you enjoyed this episode of the Be Ready Utah PrepCast.
Like what you’re seeing? Have a question about anything related to emergency preparedness? Or do
you have a comment about something you’ve learned as you make a plan or get
a kit? We’d love to hear from you. Comment or reply to us on Twitter or Facebook
@BeReadyUtah with #BRUPrepCast, or in the comments on YouTube.
We’ll talk about it on one of the next episodes of the Be Ready Utah PrepCast. Don’t forget to share these videos and your own adventures in preparedness with
your friends, family, neighbors, and co-workers, because anytime is a good time to talk about emergency preparedness. See you next time! [rock music]

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